Tuesday, September 22, 2009

Utility Leaves Chamber Over Climate Issue



September 22, 2009, Pacific Gas & Electric, the big California utility, has pulled out of the United States Chamber of Commerce over what its chairman, Peter Darbee, termed “fundamental differences” over the climate change issue.

In a letter to the Chamber — a business group that has often been a vocal critic of President Obama’s policies to regulate greenhouse gas emissions — Mr. Darbee wrote: We find it dismaying that the Chamber neglects the indisputable fact that a decisive majority of experts have said the data on global warming are compelling and point to a threat that cannot be ignored. In our opinion, an intellectually honest argument over the best policy response to the challenges of climate change is one thing; disingenuous attempts to diminish or distort the reality of these challenges are quite another. Excerpts from the letter were published on PG&E’s blog, Next100.com. PG&E is the dominant utility in northern California, and has aggressively pursued energy efficiency and renewable energy. More >>>

Saturday, September 19, 2009

Natural Resources Minister leads energy delegation to Europe


Friday, 18 September 2009 Minister for Natural Resources and Labour Omar W. Hodge left the Territory Tuesday as head of a delegation to Europe to aid in developing the BVI’s energy policy.

The primary purpose of the trip is to determine the feasibility of using waste gasification for energy generation and to view the energy conversion practices at resident plants.

Minister Hodge said the trip will provide the framework needed for Government to explore first hand energy consumption patterns used in industrial countries and identify efficiency measures necessary for local implementation.

“We know that we cannot continue our dependence on oil as over the past year the price has fluctuated widely with a high of $147.00 per barrel. We are seeking to be proactive in identifying green solutions for our energy needs,” Hon. Hodge said. More >>>

Saturday, September 12, 2009

European Union Begins Ban of Incandescent Light Bulbs


The ban of incandescent light bulbs in the EU has been motivated by the fact that they are 75% less eco-friendly than compact fluorescent light bulbs, plus CFL’s last 10 times longer so they not only save on energy consumption and cost, but the light bulb very quickly pays for itself through its savings.

Little by little, nations worldwide are doing their part to reduce their environmental footprint, and this is one way that the EU is hoping to do their part!
The European Union is on the cutting-edge of green technology; already ahead of many nations through its introduction a ban of incandescent light bulbs that began on September 1, 2009. The ban of these incandescent light bulbs has a goal of reducing region-wide energy costs through use of the more eco-friendly compact fluorescent light bulbs instead.
In order to move forward with this ban of incandescent light bulbs, the EU is not allowing retailers in the area to purchase these lighting options which take a known toll on the environment and our household energy costs. With fairness in mind, however, retailers are allowed to continue to sell incandescent light bulbs that they already have in stock. By implementing this ban, the EU is hoping that it will contribute to their goal of reducing greenhouse gasses by 2010 and will convert the population to becoming more energy-efficient in their line of thinking. THe public has not reacted entirely favorably to this ban, protesting that they have the right to choose their own lighting options in their homes; but meanwhile, the United States is watching closely to see how well received it is since a similar initiative will be underway in 2012.

The ban of incandescent light bulbs in the EU has been motivated by the fact that they are 75% less eco-friendly than compact fluorescent light bulbs, plus CFL’s last 10 times longer so they not only save on energy consumption and cost, but the light bulb very quickly pays for itself through its savings. Little by little, nations worldwide are doing their part to reduce their environmental footprint, and this is one way that the EU is hoping to do their part! More >>>

Wednesday, September 9, 2009

Find your new electric vehicle

Plug-In Vehicle Tracker: What’s Coming, When

Virtually every major auto manufacturer in the world, along with several smaller outfits, is developing a plug-in electric vehicle and Plug In America is tracking their progress. Our list below will be updated monthly. It represents highway-capable cars and trucks, 2- and 3-wheeled and commercial vehicles. Low-speed electric vehicles and conversions are not included. For a list of Neighborhood Electric Vehicles, visit http://www.eaaev.org/eaalinks.html#NEVs.

More >>>

Telephone your Member of Parliament and ask them to pass the requisite legislation to enable the importation and licensing of alternativly powered vehicles.

Sunday, September 6, 2009

The planet-saver that's still just a pipe dream

Carbon capture and storage is expensive, risky and may not work, writes Paddy Manning.

September 7, 2009 : THERE may be a few forced smiles when Martin Ferguson dishes out $2.4 billion in funding for a handful of "flagship" carbon capture and storage projects (CCS), intended to clean up carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired power stations.

As the Energy and Resources Minister knows, these CCS projects have taken one helluva time to get up and running - and it will be a long while yet before they make any significant contribution to Australia's CO2 emission reductions.

For at least a decade, the coal industry has promoted a range of clean coal technologies, including CCS, as an alternative to renewable energy. But as necessary emission reduction trajectories get deeper and steeper, the industry has been tardy - stubborn, even - about paying for it.

Instead the public will foot most of the bill for CCS, and will wear the liability if it goes wrong. More >>>